Thingiverse

Byadministrator

IIT Delhis 3D bioprinted knee cartilage is Indias first lab-grown printed tissue

A team of scientists from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in Delhi has made a breakthrough in the development of 3D bioprinted cartilage. The research team, led by Professor Sourabh Ghosh from the Department of Textile Technology at IIT, has successfully developed a bioink that can be used to print structures like the cartilage found in human knees.
Byadministrator

3D printed conch shells could be basis of stronger helmets & body armor, MIT study finds

Researchers at MIT have taken a close look at conch shells to discover how they are so resistant to impact, recreating the complex organic structures using a 3D printer. The researchers say that artificial conch-like structures could be used to create stronger helmets and body armor.
Byadministrator

Gamer 3D prints replica of laser pistol from Fallout 3, complete with storage case and extra energy cells

Some of the most fun amateur uses of 3D printing we’ve seen have been from gamers, who have often sought to physically replicate iconic features of their favourite virtual universes. Weapons, helmets and much more besides have been 3D printed to impressive levels of accuracy, with fans of Konami’s Metal Gear Solid series and Bungie’s Destiny games being particularly active on this front.
Byadministrator

Canadas UNB opens $5M research facility for metal 3D printing in marine and defense

Canada has launched its very first metal 3D printing research center geared towards the marine and defense industries. Dubbed the Marine Additive Manufacturing Centre of Excellence, the new facility is being established at the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton and was realized through a partnership between the latter, Custom Fabricators and Machinists (CFM), and community colleges in the provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.
Byadministrator

LLNL researchers adapt NIF tech for faster-than-ever DiAM metal 3D printing

A team of researchers from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) says it has developed a new and faster method for 3D printing metal objects. Called Diode-based Additive Manufacturing (DiAM), the process is reportedly capable of printing “faster than ever” thanks to an OALV technology originally developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF).